Latest Entries

#004 Junk DNA of the Digital Mind

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#004

Title: “Junk DNA of the Digital Mind”

Year: 2013

Size: A5 16 pages

Materials: Digital print, on 100gsm uncoated. 

“Junk DNA of the Digital Mind”

Experiments with circuit bent 1980’s / 1990’s video game technology as a method to reveal the collective memories of the pre-internet age. Photos and descriptions taken from notes documenting some of these possible memory traces.

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    #003 “Rags & Tatters” (from ‘Goo of Childhood’ series)

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    #003

    Title: “Rags & Tatters” (from ‘Goo of Childhood’ series)

    Year: 2010

    Size: 37cm (x) x 32cm (y)

    Materials: Digital print, mounted on cardboard, perforated in 7.5mm squares. 

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      #002 “Lavender, Ruins, Ghost” (from ‘Goo of Childhood’ series)

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      #002

      Title: “Lavender, Ruins, Ghost” (from ‘Goo of Childhood’ series)

      Year: 2010

      Size: 31cm (x) x 32cm (y)

      Materials: Digital print, mounted on cardboard, perforated in 7.5mm squares, pins inserted throughout. 



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        #001 “Moon, Long way from home” (from ‘Goo of Childhood’ series)

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        #001

        Title: “Moon, Long way from home” (from ‘Goo of Childhood’ series)

        Year: 2010

        Size: 33cm (x) x 41cm (y)

        Materials: Digital print, mounted on cardboard, perforated in 7.5mm squares, pins inserted throughout.

        Notes: Design used for cover of Kinglux magazine issue 2, 1 only, signed
         

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          Kinglux Art, Designs, Sketches and Ideas back catalogue

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          After a decade of creating books, magazines and artworks the Kinglux archive is full with projects, pictures, and one-off items. Over the coming weeks, they will be added to this site and available to purchase. All items are either entirely unique or of very limited editions and many of the books have only a few copies left in stock.

           

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            Actual Futures :

            An Incantation for a Broken Dream, January 1st 2000AD


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              Junk DNA of the Digital Mind

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              Circuit bent 1980’s video game systems reveal the electronic collective subconscious of a generation from the pre-internet age.

              More examples over on this tumblr Divine Glitches

               

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                Kinglux Magazine Issue 2

                Now available to order!
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                The brand new issue of Kinglux magazine features the motherboard.tv articles in print for the first time – Iain Sinclair on surveillance culture poetics, Corey Arcangel’s Beat The Champ, Dr David Luke discussing DMT entities, JG Ballard’s house for sale, a manifesto on why talking about new technology is better than building it which was from a talk given at the Virtual Futures conference, the ghosts of a Cambodian torture chamber and more!

                UPDATE 16/10/12: Counter-culture legend V.VALE gives the issue some love:

                “KINGLUX: A Scientific Romance, Issue 2, Price 5 UK pounds. 7.7×11″, color cover, 76pp. Future Technology of the No-Money Generation: Magick, Cambodia Torture Ghosts, DMT, Modern Shamanism, #Occupy, Broken Capitalism, JG Ballard’s House, Cory Arcangel, Psychogeography, Mobile Phone Militia, Stelarc, Surveillance Poetry with Iain Sinclair. Do you see why we highly recommend that you send for this beautiful paper publication created by TONY HILL? ”

                 

                 

                CLICK TO PURCHASE — £5 inc. P+P in UK

                You can also find it in Atlantis Bookshop Map: 49a Museum Street, London

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                  Abraxas Magazine – Creative Director

                  Kinglux will be designing the ultra-luxe esoteric art journal from issue 3

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                  It’s with great pleasure that I can announce to having been appointed Creative Director on the incredibly beautiful and fascinating journal Abraxas.

                  Abraxas aims to represent the best of the international esoteric scene in a high quality printed format. As a bi-annual journal, it seeks to offer relevant and thought-provoking features: ranging from essays that are scholarly and engaging, to images and sounds that challenge and inspire. Our print run is limited, and every issue employs lavish colour and exotic papers – providing for the reader a rare sensory sorcery. Indeed, it is our intent that Abraxas should embody that magical, creative nexus which feeds both mind and soul. And in a world fraught with troubles, our approach is refreshingly non-partisan and inclusive… join us!

                   

                  You can check out the website here, or the Facebook page here, or the Pinterest here.

                   

                  Issue 3 is firmly underway and is scheduled for the end of 2012.

                  Many thanks to Robert Ansell and Christina Oakley Harrington for their vision.

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                    Public Agent

                    A psychogeographic tour of London, June 2012
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                    “So I am a public agent and don’t know who I work for, get my instructions from street signs, newspapers and pieces of conversation I snap out of the air the way a vulture will tear entrails from other mouth.” – William Burroughs, The Soft Machine

                    Beginning with a typically paradoxical quote from William Burroughs, I began to explore London with the the keen eye of a public agent taking part in something highly specific, although temporarily forgotten – obscure thoughts, much like a dream upon awakening.
                    This imbued curious vistas, anomalies, posters and exhibits with a sense of mysterious correspondence.

                    This booklet collates a number of photographs taken from several journeys around the capital during June 2012. Tarot cards, idiot phrenology, schizophrenic/enlightenment rantings, a hypnotic TV tableux, chemically damaged polaroids, secondhand books, St. Paul’s Cathedral, mystical graphic design, royalist folk art, anti-capitalist protest material, found poetry (or language assignments?), and outdated scientific theories all combine to form a visual narrative in the manner of a piece of cut-up prose poetry.

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                      Kinglux Magazine Issue 1 :

                      Now online!

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                      This issue is inspired by and devoted to JG Ballard, the English author, who began his career as a science-fiction author. By the time he passed away in 2009, he was classed as one of the preeminent thinkers of modern life. His visions of a world of packaged homogenity and the barely disguised threat of violence could well describe the night bus back from a modern town centre, or any number of present day situations. We still have a few copies from the second printing, available for £15 from here:

                      Click here to go to the online shop…

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                        Iain Sinclair and 2012 Doom :

                        (Article originally appeared on motherboard.tv)
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                        Iain Sinclair’s newest book, Ghost Milk, is a four hundred page journal, poem, travelogue, catalogue of horrors, occult ledger, phantom reminisce and irate ‘not-in-my-backyard’ petition to the council all rolled into one knockout blow, aimed squarely at the jaws of the £9billion behemoth.

                        No aspect of the project is spared a lashing from Sinclair’s razor edged tongue. “The scam of scams was always the Olympics… Orgies of lachrymose nationalism. War by other means. Warrior-athletes watched, from behind dark glasses, by men in suits and uniforms. The pharmaceutical frontline. Californian chemists running their eye-popping, vein clustered, vest-stripping androids against degendered state-laboratory freaks. Bearded ladies and teenage girls who have never had periods. Medals are returned by disgraced drug cheats: to be passed on to others who weren’t caught, that time”.


                        Throughout the book he returns to stories of the mysterious stones and minerals of the Olympic site. Far more fascinating than the gold-silver-bronze on the podiums, he shares tales of hijacked platinum, thorium-poisoned building sites and radioactive uranium-plutonium freights on vulnerable, adjacent train tracks. His ire is continually heated by over-zealous site-guards, “…paranoid security measures required to counter the threat of terrorism: a threat they provoked by infiltrating this grand project park”.

                        He visits previous Olympic sites – Hitler’s 1936 Berlin games, Greece’s bankrupting 2004 pantheon and takes detours to Manchester, the late JG Ballard’s home, anywhere to clear his mind of the monstrous developers which he likens to “Dr. Frankenstein with a Google Earth programme and a laser scalpel”.

                        As a microcosm of the bureaucratic ineptitude he uncovers, Sinclair cites the flurry of publicity when council officials prevented him from promoting his ideas in a public library, inadvertently bringing the writer into the national media.

                        He picks open previous grand projects including his favourite scab, the Millennium Dome, (“hard to decide, as CCTV cameras swivel, if it’s an English Guantánamo or a car-boot sale waiting to happen”) and makes a convincing case as to why that project was just a warm-up lap for the miserable 2012 “five-hooped handcuffs”.

                        Sinclair’s greatest gift is to link seemingly unconnected dots to bring new meanings on landscapes so familiar that they have become invisible. He underwrites dirty streets with artistic magic and hidden energy lines that might, for example, connect tired Stoke Newington with Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and the Kubrick recreation of Vietnam in nearby Newham. The outcome of this semiotic redevelopment is one that leaves the legacy of these historic ‘non-places’ with a greater sense of value than any multi-billion pound CGI promise. In fact, the greatest part of the 2012 aftermath will be a huge shopping centre. “The proper response… is a happy slap of enchantment”, he writes.

                        Although declining the possibility of grey collar politics, this book might prove to be the manifesto for the people’s mayor of Hackney, or perhaps an epitaph on a white-elephant’s graveyard.

                        ‘Ghost Milk: Calling Time on the Grand Project’ by Iain Sinclair; published by Penguin.

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                          Christian Bök :

                          The Allen Ginsberg of Bacteria

                          (Article originally appeared on motherboard.tv, sub-editted by Sean Yeaton)
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                          Pity the plight of the poet. Misunderstood by the public and unloved by the publishers. Gone are the days of hep cat poets of the beat generation, the celebrated voices of dissent to a modern world enthralled by shopping and atomic bombs.

                          However, all that could change if Canadian poet and self-taught bio-engineer Christian Bök realises his ambitions for a poetry that uses organisms as its blank page. Bök’s intention is that poetry will no longer be on the brink of extinction, instead it will be the only form of life left long after the extinction of humanity. He plans to do this by encoding transhuman, existentialist poetry secreted into the DNA of a near-indestructible bacteria.

                          Inspired by William Burrough’s proclaimation that “word is a virus,” Bök set out to prove it through bio-engineering. Using the four letter codes of DNA, he created a system that could be used to encrypt the letters of the alphabet. Having worked out a cypher from eight trillion possibilities, he wanted to insert the code into a purpose-built DNA sequence and then inject it into the bacteria.

                          Via the magic of DNA, RNA recoding, and splitting helixes, he also needed a code to decipher the newly created protein. Early experiments were unpromising. His attempts to insert a line from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, “THE DANE,” triggered a protein response from the bacteria of “EAT SHIT.” Unperturbed by this and after four years of further experiments, homebrew encryption software eventually yielded a workable code that could be used and recombined to interpret a response message.

                          Bök’s original poem, a masculine battlecry of life and fate is re-encoded by the bacteria as a gentle ode to fairies, rosy glow, loss and milk, a motherly ode to balance the original machissimo of the “Pater-physical narrative.” This inspired the creation of a pleasant design touch meaning that the new cell will flouresce red in the dark, like the line of the response poem: “The fairy is rosy of glow.

                          With the DNA structure theoretically defined, it was decided to insert it into an E.coli bacterium. When it emerged that the structure wasn’t sufficiently stable, Bök realised he had inadvertently created the first molecular poetry critic. Nature decreed his poem unworthy and it “died.”

                          The ultimate aim for the poem — now called a “Xenotext” — is for it to be inserted into a super resistant bacteria to become a kind of “archive machine.” The bacteria chosen is called phi-x-174, one that is so resistant it could survive nuclear war, life in a vacuum, and “so tough it could devour plutonium,” thereby outliving the human race and becoming an immortal “message in a bottle, in an ocean of the infinite.” Bök calls it, “a literary artifact until the sun explodes”.

                          Phi-x-174, the first fully sequenced genome, a virus that infects E.coli bacteria and is so enduring, bordering on indestructible, that it has been hypothesised that it originated in outer space. The Arcturus star has been suggested as the most likely origin, such is its resistance to extremes that no environment on Earth could ever have evolved such an invincible lifeform. It is capable of surviving gamma radiation one thousand times stronger than would be neccessary to obliterate a human. This is “life at extremes of it’s own definition,” according to Bök.

                          One of Bök’s poems about his cellular plaything is called “The Extremeophile.” Reading it aloud he sounds like a cross between Allen Ginsberg debuting “Howl” and a spoken word perfomance by Henry Rollins. To paraphrase the yet-to-be-published prose:

                          It eats jet fuel / It eats arsenic / It never evolves /
                          It has lived through five mass extinctions / It awaits your experiments!

                          Bök taught himself everything he needed to accomplish his goal as he raced traditional science to the same endpoint. Better the first message on DNA be a poem than an advert for a software corporation.

                          Previous attempts at similar experiments have seen James Joyce quotations encoded into DNA (which triggered an organism based “cease-and-desist”).

                          If Xentotext redefines what a poet can be, by definition it also redefines what a scientist’s role is: “Geneticists as poets in the meaning of Life. There is also a microbe essential to the vitality of art.” Bök is like a pre-Enlightenment scholar, when the categories between art and nature were not easily defined. “Poetry is the germination of Word, and it requires a new language. This is poetry as the cutting edge in a new frontier of self-expression, the poetry of exploratory biogenetic gamesmanship.”

                          Given Phi-x-174’s sinister characteristics, is there any chance it could somehow wipe out humanity? “A quadrillion to one chance. More likely this project could be a fool’s errand, being too difficult to fulfill,” Bök says. “Although failure is not an option, an ephemeral project has its own beauty. A lousy poem is biodegradable. Nature and art are breaking down as categories. Perhaps we will use this idea to inscribe the last will and testament of humanity. Writing down who was to blame. Or a users manual, a copyright. An ad for Microsoft? Take the lightbulb. It’s used to illuminate the ferris wheel at night or to create the night shift”.

                          Despite writing “Canada’s best-selling poetry book ever,” Bök intones, “As an avant garde poet I have no readers. I write into a void. But who did the Egyptian pharoahs write to? Twenty-first century tourists, oddly enough. I see my work as spraypainting a heiroglyph on an obelisk. Immortality acts like a kind of punchline. This may be the only way to preserve any of our culture over epochal time”.

                          Could the Xentotext be dismissed as a kind of arrogant biological form of vandalism? Exactly the kind of attitude to technology that has dogged human endeavours, creating the destruction obsessed consumer society that the beat poets abhorred? Bök’s answer: “Humanity? We’re better than dinosaurs and microbes.”

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                            Article 12 review

                            Independent documentary review

                            (Article originally appeared on motherboard.tv, sub-editted by Sean Yeaton)
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                            In the hubbub over ‘the end of anonymity’ comes Article 12, a documentary that proposes a solution to the soft-Orwellianism of modern life.

                            The inspiration for the title refers to a key point in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, — “No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence, nor to attacks upon his honour and reputation.” And yet with every leak of sensitive data to unscrupulous officials, that demand becomes more of a tearful plea.

                            Directed by the Argentinian filmmaker Juan Manuel Biaiñ, the film examines how personal privacy has eroded with our complicity. Using a peeping-tom camera style, we are brought back to the individual human effect of having our every move, thought and purchase analyzed to reveal personal, financial, spiritual and sexual secrets. When Facebook makes privacy changes that affect half a billion accounts, it seems somehow irritating on a personal level, its global effects are abstract and intangible. But spy through the window of an unaware young woman, and the issue of privacy becomes considerably creepier, and universal.

                            In one scene, scientists prove what Banksy fans have known for years: rats under surveillance become neurotic. Apparently humans behave in the same way. Couple that with the notion that your data shadow has become more important than your physical body, and it’s no wonder we feel angst. The only comparable time was the late medieval period, when the threat of an all-seeing God was the best way to control peoples’ actions and thoughts. In a post-religious age, the lens of the omnipresent CCTV camera has replaced the eye of God.

                            The rapid decrease of civil liberties began with 9/11 and the ’War on Terror.’ Unfortunately, the war in Iraq is also responsible, some argue, for creating a seven-fold likelihood of increased terrorist activity.

                            A key development of that war has been in the use of unmanned aerial drones. UAEs that once scoured Baghdad for still elusive weapons of mass destruction are now circling our cities for equally elusive targets. “You cannot beat London for Orwellian,” says Emmanuel Goldstein, publisher of hacker journal, 2600. The quest for freedom is not the same path as physical safety. A psychologically developed adult should prefer a sense of liberty and the responsibilities that brings over a need for mollycoddling Big Brother bureaucracy.

                            The second half of the film captures a series of fantasy hacktivists as they run pranks on communications technologies in Times Square and the Telecom Tower, with possible methods for DIY revolution tossed in.

                            Brian Eno’s preferred tactic of sedition is through the use of ‘propergenda’, the idea of talking about the news stories that really matter instead of falling in line with the “monolithic thinking that media produces”. And he’ll put his money where his gold-toothed mouth is, promising cash to anyone who intends to blow up a TV transmitter for the cause.

                            If financing another media overthrow, like the one that Rupert Murdoch has brought on himself, is beyond your post-recession means, a good place to start might be a handwritten letter to Eno, and a target. There are plenty of them.

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                              Stelarc :

                              Virtual Futures 2.0’11

                              (Article originally appeared on motherboard.tv, sub-editted by Sean Yeaton)
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                              Billed as ‘the Glastonbury rock festival of cyberculture,’ the only mud to be found at the Virtual Futures 2.0 conference, which took place last week at Warwick University, was made on campus mainframes. Some of the first day’s events included the following mind-altering lectures

                              •    A Marxist retelling of the internet as a doomsday prevention device,
                              •    How to create life from potash and olive oil
                              •    The shimmering world of 1990’s monochrome text adventure games
                              •    How the smell of burning flesh and an Xbox shoot ‘em up can help damaged soldiers
                              •    Pro-anorexia websites as an ecology of support and starvation.

                              However, it was the mild mannered Australian cybernetic performance artist, Stelarc, who held the audience in a rapt trance of fascination and horror, snapping his own mobile phone pictures along the ride. During his presentation, he revisited his artistic CV, from suspending himself with meathooks through to the problems he faced constructing a massive robotic exoskeleton and filling chrome-gumball blender. with gallons of his body’s fluids.

                              As the foremost proponent of art gallery cybernetics, Stelarc has declared the body obsolete and proposes total augmentation with chimeric architecture – “an alternate evolutionary structure.”

                              Ruling his graceful physique like a Survival Research Laboratory experiment in the body mod scene, Stelarc referred to himself in the third person, deliberately confirming his disdain and disinterest in the fleshy shell that contains his vital ideas generator.

                              He delivered light-hearted descriptions of near fatal infections from growing a third ear on his forearm, to humble admissions that low-level sports injuries have prevented him from grafting upgrades to his new web-connected ear.

                              Stelarc described his sprouting protheses as being “not from a sense of lack, but a sense of excess” – cut to photographs of lasers shooting from his eyes, like a pirate on MDMA from John Carpenter’s The Fog. This, from a man (if we can call him that anymore) who has experienced an “involuntary body” where his limbs were controlled from global locations, and has succeeded in building and writing with a mechanical third arm.

                              Towards the end of his talk, Stelarc revealed his new best friend: a snarling PS2-era avatar that he’d programmed to communicate and sing in circuit bent pitches.
                              The spell Stelarc had cast over the crowd at Warwick was broken only by the occasional cackle made in reference to funding problems related to body-hacking and neural jacking. That, and sporadic bursts of extremely loud machine gun bio-industrial music.